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Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia Multimedia Artist Živka Suvić – An Interview

As an artist myself, I am drawn to other artists. When I come across an interesting artist, I look at their work and imagine what caused them to create it. In all cases, the time and place of an artist influences their work, even if it is doing so unconsciously.
 
We are all influenced by our country, our upbringing, experiences, and so forth. Every artist has a story, and it informs their work in intimate ways. This is an obvious fact, but that doesn’t make it less interesting, because seeing an artists’ work is like seeing into their life in some way.
 
When I came across the work of Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia multimedia artist Živka Suvić, I was very interested in her creative process, because there was so much work and it has an intensity and energy that myself, as a Canadian, finds very different from the art I tend to see around here in Canada.

This is only logical. Every country in this world is different, and Serbia certainly has its own character. What that character is, I don’t know exactly, having not been to Serbia.
 
I know Serbian-born people who are living here in Canada right now, but it is not the same as visiting the country or knowing their history in detail. Clearly, Serbia has had its share of unrest, and like it or not, this often breeds great artwork.
 
In my own rather uneducated way, I could sense
 
Working in multiple mediums including assemblage, portraiture, landscape, and even incorporating video, Živka’s work seems to me to be of the sort that comes from a dark, restless soul. At the same time, there is hope in her work.
 
In her portraits, eyes stare back at you, some
 
After checking out Živka’s website, I wanted to ask her some questions about her work. Art speaks for itself, but if you have a chance to talk to the creator of that work, why not?
 
And so, I spoke with Živka recently and got a better idea of what makes this Serbian artist tick. I hope you enjoy our chat!


Q: What inspires you to make art these days?
Art is my path, my way of communicating, my way to express myself. Since I was a child, I enjoyed painting or drawing. Later, I choose art to be my life’s occupation, or maybe art chose me.
 
I don’t know, except to say that this is the way I function. Inspiration is around everywhere…
 
Q: What descriptive words come to mind to describe your own artwork?
Collecting, expression, time, materials…these are some of words. Also…consistency…etc.

Q: How much does Serbian culture influence your artwork?
I’ve finished my studies at the Art Academy in Serbia, and during that educational process, we students were well informed with the world of art history.
 
Art history also covered the national history of art, but the focus wasn’t necessarily on national works. On the contrary, we had the freedom of choice to choose our models.
 
Probably, the national culture has an impact on my work today, perhaps unconsciously, and certainly that social situation plays a big role on my life…
 
Q: How often do you show your work publicly?
I would say often. Last year, I had five independent exhibitions, and this year I have two. In addition, I exhibit in group shows.
 

 
Q: Has a secret patron ever emerged from the shadows who wants to give you a vast sum of money to support you in your endeavours?
No, there was no secret patrons. I have customers, buyers, but patrons…no.
 
Q: Why do you like creating artwork which has a tactile surface?
I use specific materials, and their nature allows me to create artwork which has a tactile surface. I use papers, different thickness, cardboard, and decoupage technique. That’s why the surface is tactile.
 
Q: Do you consider your art messy?
No, I don’t consider my art messy. There is a certain order within what I am doing. Every act of creation requires certain a chaos around it, but within the work there is a line.
 

 
Q: Do you consider some of your art to be “dark”?
Yes, I do, they are probably dark. But they are just some of my works. I think about the effect my work could have on the observer. I can control what I want to exhibit.
 
Q: When painting your landscapes or your expressive portraits, do you paint from memory or prefer to do the work live?
I usually combine the two. Sometimes, I start live and finish my work from memory….or vice versa.
 
Q: What is your special connection to New Zealand?
I spent a year and a half there studying, and New Zealand remained in my good memory. I met wonderful people and made friends there.
 
Q: What is the purpose of an assemblage, in your view?
Specifically, assemblages that I’ve made in New Zealand stayed in the Art school in Dunedin, as an exhibit and demonstration material for future students.
 
I created them through a process of collecting discarded materials which were put in pillows and boxes. Each pillow symbolically represents a dream.

Q: How often do you like to visit the ocean? Do you prefer oceans to lakes?
I’m fascinated by water, in general. Right now, I don’t have any opportunity to see an ocean, but there is a river passing trough the city I’m living in.
 
Q: Do you have any artists from the past who serve as inspirations to your work now?
Yes, I have many artists who are my inspiration, even though their work has no direct impact on mine, like Robert Rausenberg, Roy Lichtenstein, and Arman. These are some of artists who inspire me.
 
Q: What are your artistic goals for the future?
Goals…I’m working on my new paintings and maybe, in the future, I will develop a story about assemblages. I have a goal to continue working, exhibiting, and selling my work…
 

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Still Lifes of Suzanne Valadon – Where No “Decent” Woman Would Tread

Much has been said on the nudes of Suzanne Valadon, and rightly so. Truly, they are wonderfully composed and naturally iconoclastic in nature.

Women. Real women portrayed in natural scenarios by other women was unheard of in the late 1800s and into the 1900s. Generally women did not tackle nudes at all; the powers that be fearing the practice would corrupt delicate souls.

Valadon, exempt from propriety due in part to humble birth and in other part her choice of tawdry career as an art model, was able to express herself in ways other women could or would not at the time. She was admitted into salons (where no “decent” woman would tread) and even found herself the first woman painter of Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts (SNBA), in 1894.

Here she is pictured with her son, Maurice, in 1889.

All this is quite spectacular on its own, but I would like to leave the icon smashing and feminist critique behind for a short while. I’d even like to leave the entirety of her personal life behind. Today we will look at Valadon as a genderless painter of fruit and flowers. We will examine her still lifes and perhaps see the merit the SNBA saw when they chose to add her to the pantheon of art gods.

Bouquet de Roses dans un Obus, oil on card, 1913

One of my favourites, Suzanne places roses inside an obus (cannon shell). To the roses she gives definition with her characteristic heavy lines. To the obus, however, she uses soft short strokes.

This renders an object of war nothing more than a harmless vase. The placement of the object on a kitchen sill next to feminine lilac drapes annihilates the last bit of danger to the point that the obus loses its meaning entirely.

Even knowing what cannon shells of the period look like, a viewer would be hard pressed to identify it as such. Bordering on symbolist, she keeps the colours orthodox and avoids contrivance.

It is a balanced work that evokes a timely “Frenchness”, and a little titter at the tender emasculation of a phallic object (whoops, some feminist critique slipped in).


Untitled, oil on card, 1930

Speaking of timely Frenchness, what could be more delightfully 1930s French than a blue vase stuffed with roses? Never a servant of style, Valadon takes a more post impressionist (but not quite) look at these flowers.

Her beautiful built up highlights and shadows are made somehow more realistic by the presence of clear brushwork. The flowers are lit up from within.

Her choice of perspective is ever so slightly naïve, causing the vase to float, lending extra emphasis to it as a focal point. Objects in the background are arranged firmly in reality though, grounding the whole thing on what I’m sure was a wonderfully printed tablecloth.

Valadon painted many roses, tulips, orchids and the like, but her greatest still lifes often involved the honesty of circumstance her nudes had in spades as well.

A common basket of even commoner duck eggs waits quietly for the cook, nestled in straw. The stonework is alive with colour, both in light and shadow.

Valadon does not half paint even the most simple of highlights. The way the light falls over the eggs and onto the wall brings to mind an open door; perhaps the cook has come for these blue cast beauties at last.


Basket of Duck Eggs, oil on card, 1931

Nature Morte au Lièvre, Faisan et Pomme, oil on card, 1930

Pieces like, Still life with Hare, Pheasant and Apple, convince us of Suzanne’s sense of humour. An old hare dangles almost peacefully from hind legs drained and awaiting a competent cook to relieve it of its skin in one swift pull.

The young pheasant seems to be dreaming grand, worried dreams despite its questionable life status. Apples sit pertly on a plate, as if to rub in how alive they are; not knowing they all share the same fate.

A quick laugh is had at the idea of a “nature morte” of dead animals. It’s so on the nose if it weren’t for the sombre, reverent overtones this piece would risk vulgarity. As it stands though, in characteristic Valadon style, she goes just far enough.

We feel the ambivalence of the old hare, the tragedy of the young pheasant and the haughtiness of the apples. It mirrors truth, not to mention the sanctifying warmth pervading the scene is downright Fauvist.

Given her close ties with Ganguin, this is unsurprising. Suzanne’s emotional colour vocabulary is extremely developed across her still lifes and painted portraits.

So far the emphasis has been on her later, more developed works, but what of earlier material?


Nature morte au compotier de fruits, oil on card, 1917

Again, nearly symbolist in nature, this fruit bowl is absolutely uncommon. Her slight naivete of perspective keeps a sense of stuffy refinement far away from her popular and often grossly academic subject.

Colours, simply layered, build a juicy pear and living grapes. She bothers to paint the calyx of an upside down apple though. In fact, this composition is rife with luxurious, unnecessary details.

The brocade stripes of the wall cover, blue details on the china pedestal bowl and the delicately defined wicker table stand in sharp contrast to the relatively faceless fruit.

She forces the viewer to realize detail in objects she omitted it from. Like so many excellent paintings, it is what is left unpainted that is remarkable.

Remarkable works, Valadon has many. In her time she was a immensely popular and respected artist, though time can cruelly erase that which does not fit the appropriate narrative.

Suzanne, when she is mentioned at all, is mostly talked about in terms of being a revolutionary woman (she was) or being a woman in the den of great men (Ganguin, Cezanne, Latrec…).

Her life is often cast, if cast at all, in the red glow of bawdiness thanks to the childish puritanism of our modern world. This I think, though titillating, is unfair.

Her work shows a greatness of spirit and a delicacy of soul. She mastered the concepts of ‘soft’ and ‘hard’; played with humour and nuance.

Everything about her art suggests an actualized, inspired, aspiring mind. If anything, Valadon achieved in life what most artists only achieve in death.

The respect and admiration of her peers. It would be wonderful if she were appreciated in death the way she was lauded in life.

Let us quietly appreciate a grouping of more typical Valadon still lifes and see what Gauguin saw in a talented, young art model so many years ago.


Bouquet des Fleurs 1937

White Fruit Bowl undated

Roses dans une Verre 1937

Her confident lines are instantly recognizable as is her slightly off perspective. Even working with universal subjects, she manages to make every vignette intensely personal.

Her still lifes are as intimate, in my opinion, as her nudes and deserve as much notoriety in popular art critique beyond the French Riviera. Though, it must be said again, her nudes are extremely worthy of examination.


The Future Unveiled, 1912

So please, no more of this “Mistress and Muse of Montmartre” crap that appears in so much analysis of her. When it comes to Valadon there is plenty to talk about inside the frame.

Speculating on the woman more than the work does no one any favours and has constantly robbed the present of the honest presence of a brilliant artist. Suzanne Valadon; a Crown Jewel of Montmartre.

This is her rightful place and there she will live in my heart and mind forever.

Photo of Valadon, Photographer and date unknown


 

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Mersad Berber – The Famous Bosnian Artist and his Sacred Themes

Mersad Berber, one of the greatest and most distinctive Bosnian painters and graphic artists, was born on January, 1, 1940 in Bosanski Petrovac, a small town in western Bosnia in former Yugoslavia.

Few months after his birth, due to the large massacre in Petrovac in the 1940s, the Berber family arrived to Banja Luka as refugees to escape the fighting as the World War II spilled over into the Balkans.

Background

Berber’s father had a hair salon for women in the centre of Banja Luka, and his mother was a gifted weaver, one of the greatest in Bosnia.

She worked in the tradition of Bosnian carpets, which have deep Anatolian roots, and she established school for carpet weavers at the end of her life.

The young Berber inherited his mother’s artistic talent; his skills as a draftsman became apparent from a young age- from his early adolescence he was producing remarkable drawings and painting on paper.

In 1959, Mersad Berber began his formal art education at the Academy of Fine Arts in Ljubljana, Slovenia.

According to his own word, he owed permanent gratitude to several of his professors; Bozidar Jakac, a classic of Slovenian graphic art, and Zoran Krizisnik, a brilliant curator and founder of the famous Ljubljana International Biennale.

Krizisnik included him in the Yugoslavian selection when he was a second year student, and his etching master Bozidar Jakac, with whom he learned etching privately, alongside his studies at the Academy.

In 1961, his works were exhibited at the Ljubljana Graphic Arts Biennale, one of the prestigious art events of the period, along with works by the leading graphic artists from all over the world.

Berber’s early drawing and prints demonstrated the influence of the academy in terms of technique, and, in the other hand, his interest in expressing cultural traditions using a modern visual expression in terms of subject matter.

He received the prestigious Prešern Award for his work.

Post Graduate

In 1963, the young artist started a postgraduate course in graphic arts in professor Rika Debeljak’s class. His choice of that very technique was to significantly mark his entire opus.

Since 1965 and his first solo exhibition at the City Gallery of Ljubljana, the career of this remarkable artist has been on sharp rise.

The artistic scene in former Yugoslavia, also in that of Tito’s successor Slobodan Milosevic, had been characterized not by anything resembling Soviet Socialist Realism but by a tepid adherence to middle-of-the-road modernist styles.

Very few artists managed to create reputations for themselves outside their own region. Berber’s success in breaking out of this situation was altogether exceptional.

In 1978, Berber received a teaching at the Academy of Fine Arts in Sarajevo, and set a a studio there. By that time, he had already achieved considerable international recognition, mainly as a graphic artist.

War

This comfortable existence and professional career was abruptly torn apart by the wars that broke out Yugoslavia in 1990’s, just over a decade after the death of Marshal Tito, who had held that region together.

During the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina 1992-1995, Berber’s house and studio were destroyed.

The Berber family escaped in Croatia on a UN transport plane. In order to rebuild his life, he created a new studio in Zagreb, and another one in Dubrovnik. However, memories of the war continued to haunt him, but provided material for his art.

A wide array of Berbers’s works range from the deep, opaque whites influenced by his travels to Bosnia’s fairy-tale landscapes to the dark and terrible pits of Srebrenica.

His inspiration mostly originates from the mystical world of Bosnia, its Ottoman past, and the tragic venture of its people.

Inspired by the masters of European fine arts from the Renaissance to Art Nouveau, with the artists such as Velazquez, Ingres or Klimt, as well as Yugoslavian painters Vlaho Bukovac and Gabrijel Jurkic, Berber’s work infuses intricate talent and expressive powers.

Berber’s work gives a good idea of the breadth of his cultural interests, but the frequent fragmentation of the images also makes it clear that these are the product of an extremely contemporary sensibility.

His paintings, etchings and prints include elegant female portraits, based on High Renaissance prototypes, with which he challenged the 16th century masters of the Venetian school; painting of horses which recall his love for the peasant life of the Bosnian countryside; paraphrases of Velazquez, which express his profound admiration for the great Spanish master.

Homage, Horses, and Suffering

Throughout his career, he made cycles of paintings which chronicle homages, events and dedications. His works are characterized by the intermingling of ancient motifs with a modern and contemporary commentary.

He employed a very wide variety of artistic techniques, from the most traditional to the most contemporary.

For instance, he made a couple of small animated films, and was fascinated by the possibilities offered by new techniques of digital printing, sometimes producing prints of enormous size.

In most of the Berber’s works, the central metaphor is the horse figure, a key symbolic animal which has many different representations and meanings in various cultures.

In Berber’s own words, this figure is not that of an impressive horse, it is a toiling packhorse from the mountains of Bosnia, having deep ties to all aspects of life, signifying hard labor and marriages, wars and funerals.

The expressive capacity of this horse, its suffering and its imperfect beauty represent the biography of Bosnian people.

Innovator, Cultural Historian

Berber is known for his mixed technique large canvases, but he differs from the European masters from whom he derived his inspiration by virtue of innovative approach to composition and his unique themes.

His paintings frequently do not deal with single image but with conjunctions of images, in some cases places side by side, but in others layered one on the top of the other.

He felt a strong allegiance to the values of Italian Renaissance art, because of its resemblance to the art of the Italian Pittura Colta movement, which derived from the later work of Giorgio de Chirico.

Yet, Berber’s paraphrases of elegant images of classical nudes, some of them are direct quotations from the work of David or Ingres, and of Renaissance portraits, were often interspersed with figures in old-fashioned Balkan dress.

His religious and literary references were also strong and complex. Some of his most impressive works offer directly Christian images, for instance the figure of Christ being taken from the Cross.

Others were inspired by the Sarajevo Haggadah, one of the most important Jewish medieval manuscripts in existence and now the chief treasure of the restored Sarajevo National Museum (Zemaljski Muzej).

In his work he reflects the full scale of the complexity of his country’s multi-layered cultural history as the pioneer of the generation of young graphic artists who opened up the local art scene to global trends.

Depicting Tragedy

Towards the close of his life, Mersad Berber made an impressive series devoted to the brutal massacre at Srebrenica, the genocide and the worst crime of the Balkan wars, in which over 8,000 Bosnian Muslims, mostly boys and men, were slaughtered by units from the Army of Republika Srpska, under the command of general Ratko Mladic.

The artist regarded the tragedy at Srebrenica as the “big, ancient, sacred theme of hymns” and laboured for years to depict it in his works, collecting forensic reports, newspaper photographs, video recordings, documents and books, and visiting Potocari and Srebrenica countless times.

These series became elegies not only for those who had died, but also for the death of multiculturalism, which had survived in the Balkans for centuries despite all ethnic and religious animosities.

Death

Mersad Berber died from heart attack on October 7, 2012 in his home in Zagreb.

Nearly forty years of his artistic activity Berber spent as a true Homo Universalis. As an excellent drawer and illustrator, Mersad Berber was occupied with graphic art, painting, graphic and poetic maps, tapestry, illustrations.

He also worked in theatre scenography, created movie posters for movies, such as those by Kusturica; his costume and scenography design came to life in theatres in Sarajevo, Zagreb, Ljubljana and Washington.

He exhibited all over the world, from London to Madrid, New York to Moscow, Jakarta and New Delhi, and received approximately 50 awards. Some scholars and experts consider him to be one of the greatest post-Classic artists in the world.

Ethical Identity

Today, Mersad Berber is one of the most famous graphic artists in the world, who was also included in the Tate Gallery Collection in 1984, makes the aesthetic and ethical identity of his homeland recognized to the million of people.

He deserved his celebrity reputation because he made heroic efforts to get with the history of the region he was born and lived in with his own personal relationship to that history.

With his unique talent that lets him forge connections between different cultures and tradition, and his intelligence that penetrates the depths of historical experience, Berber brought together styles spanning the range from antiquity to the contemporary era in a manner that was very much his own.

 

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Portrait Painting Project in Cambridge, Ontario – The Many Faces

the many faces of cambridge morph suits

What was “The Many Faces of Cambridge”?

robert fox painting john kingswood
The Many Faces of Cambridge was an art initiative and portrait project created by Robert Fox (inset right), aka BeachBabyBob, from Cambridge, Ontario Canada. Robert is a retired elementary school teacher, who has lived in Cambridge Ontario all of his life.
 
He loves this city! Robert wanted to celebrate his wonderful community of Cambridge and all the wonderful people who live there. What better way to do that than through the arts, especially when you know how powerful the arts can be.
 
Since Robert’s son, David Charles Fox, is an local artist/painter/musician, Rob decided to partner with David, and they began to paint 100 portraits of local people.
 
They also interviewed the people and wrote stories about each one. They called this art project, “The Many Faces of Cambridge”. The fun began early in 2010, and ended in June 2012.
 

The Many Faces of Cambridge - caravaggio
Robert and Bryan Rogers painted this famous Caravaggio painting. This painting represents the power and passion art has over people.

The Beginning

David Charles Fox at 2
David Charle Fox begins his art career at age 2.

“The Many Faces of Cambridge” began with David Charles Fox painting a portrait of Cambridge’s Mayor, Doug Craig. The painting shows the mayor’s true “revolutionary spirit”, according to the artist.
 
join_the_rebellion
David Charles Fox’s “Join the Rebellion”

Robert created a website called, “themanyfacesofcambridge.com”, and as the portraits were completed, not only were they displayed throughout the community, in places like the Cambridge Hospital, but they were posted on a website that Robert created just for this project.
Robert paints Stuart Summerhayes' portrait
The website no longer exists, but if you connect with Robert Fox from Cambridge Ontario, on Facebook, or you can join The Many Faces of Cambridge Facebook group, and discuss the people and art of Cambridge at length.
 

Celebration of The Arts

A teacher at our local Conestoga College involved his graduating class, by giving them an assignment to come up with the final celebration idea for the 100 paintings.
 
You can imagine the great ideas that these college students thought of i.e. turning the portraits into sign posts that would be displayed in the local parks.
 
In the end, the portraits were displayed at Cambridge’s annual art festival held in June called, “The Mayor’s Celebration of the Arts”.
The Many Faces - volunteers
Here’s a video showing the students wearing “morph suits” and carrying the portraits around the celebration festival. The idea behind these suits was so that the students wearing them could better represent the portraits they were carrying.
 
In other words, they were in the role of the subject of each painting, so each morpher would act accordingly. Here’s a video someone took of the event when it happened at the Cambridge City Hall.
 

GCI and VS morpher
Robert and David produced 2 hardcover books, which contained all the portraits, and they mentioned the people involved. One book was given to the Mayor of Cambridge, and is displayed at Cambridge City Hall. The Fox family kept the other copy for their archives.
 
Robert also entered the Awesome Foundation of KW’s contest, and tried to win $1000, so that he could pay real money to the artist who painted the portraits. He lost. Robert says, “support your local artists.”
The Awesome Foundation of KW

Artists Involved in the Many Faces… Portrait Project

cambridge portrait artists

Robert knew that he and his son, could not paint 100 portraits without help, so they recruited local artists to help them reach their goal. As in most communities, there are many great artists/painters, so it was relatively easy to find other local portrait painters to paint at least one or two portraits.
 

john kingswood
“John Kingswood” by Robert Fox

In the end, there were 110 portraits painted. Dave and Robert painted many of the paintings, but there was approximately 15 painters doing the work in the end. The paintings were given as a gift, to the people who agreed to have their portraits painted, and who graciously agreed to share their stories with the public.
 
Below is a list of the Cambridge portrait artists who assisted with the Many Faces of Cambridge project.
The Many Faces - artists

Reviews

The Many Faces - reviews

The People

The Cambridge people, who had their portraits painted, were selected by Robert at random. Robert just approached people as he met them, young and old, and if they didn’t want their portrait done, that was ok, but it seemed easy in the end to get 100 people to agree.
 
Along with their portraits, Robert interviewed them and obtained a short auto-biography of each person, which accompanied their painting, as the portrait moved throughout the community.
The Many Faces
Robert displayed the portraits and personal stories, in a variety of venues across the city, and all of the proprietors were glad to display the art. They viewed this idea as a community-builder, which was exactly why this was being done.
 
As the paintings were completed, they were displayed for one month at each location. Robert then moved them on to the next location, leaving behind a new portrait. This process lasted for approximately two years.
 

Introducing…

The following images were taken from the hardcover book, “The Many Faces of Cambridge”, made by Robert, and here is a bit about each subject.
 

Alex is a famous dancer. Bob is the Mufflerman.

Faces of Cambridge

Adam is a moviestar. Here’s Robert painting him at the local market.

Faces of Cambridge

Brenda is a great landscape painter. Bianca loves to paint Italian architecture.

Faces of Cambridge

Dan is a great barber. Danny is a yoga teacher.

The Many Faces

John knows all about trees. Elaine volunteers at the hospital thrift store called The Recovery Room in Galt.

The Many Faces

Ricardo is a professional clown. Richard is a mystery.

The Bygraves organized the Santa Claus parade in Hespeler for years. Mukhtiar walks 5 miles a day pushing his grocery cart.

Colin and Scott Tucker are identical twins and are the owners of Grand Valley Rocks on Avenue Road in Galt.

The Many Faces

John founded the Butterfly Conservatory in Cambridge. Nicholas is the youngest city counsellor in Cambridge.

The Many Faces

Marco is a software engineer who programs drones. Linda was an olympic figure skater back in the ’60’s.

Karen is an artist from Hespeler. Karl is a regional counsellor, representing Cambridge.

The Many Faces

Norman is a photographer for the National Geographic and his portrait was stolen.

Andy promotes Active Cambridge. Atinuke is a budding politician.

Faces of Cambridge

Robert met the Yetman’s at the Cambridge market.

Faces of Cambridge

Gaye is a scholar. Kristen is a fashion queen.

The Many Faces

Maya and Kevin (sister and brother) and Alexia are our future leaders.

The Many Faces

Joe is a “scene sketcher” and was born in Preston. John designed his own house. Josh is an athlete.

The Many Faces

Jill is an art volunteer extraordinaire. Stuart was a racer walker. Jane teaches kids.

The Many Faces

Jacob comes from a very artistic family. Jacky is a break dancer. Jennifer is very active in the art world.

The Many Faces

Gary writes and produces plays. John loves country music.

The Many Faces

Gary is a politician/chiropractor. Fred is an environmentalist. Flora plays the piano. Greg was the boss at the Library and Gallery for years.

The Many Faces

Jack loves turtles. Jack W. is a water colourist.

The Many Faces

Bohdanna and Brandon use to work at the YMCA.

The Many Faces

Both Brian’s love hockey.

The Many Faces

Carmen worked at the Chamber of Commerce. Bryan loves music and Rona.

The Many Faces

Jodi and Jack love the beach. Jodi sells real estate.

The Many Faces

Laura is a personal trainer. Leonie cleans teeth.

The Many Faces

Lindsay is an artist. Madonna is a hair stylist.

The Many Faces

Mary was an important employee of the Cambridge Library. Madeline was a great swimmer. Manny and Edie loved antique cars and their family very much.

The Many Faces

Maureen is a music producer. Michael loves sports. Neila manages the cleaning staff at the Y.

Pam is a city councillor. Miranda loves fashion.

The Many Faces

Phil is a singer song writer. Scot is a social activist.

The Many Faces

Margaret is a politician and ran for mayor a couple of times. Maria and her father loved their dog.

Veronica teaches fitness and Tania is an artist and business women.

The Many Faces

Incomplete …

Sue and Robert Fox have been married for over 50 years and believe that …

“Art Makes You Smart”

Lucy painted how she feels about her auntie Sue. Wendy loves her son.

Sabra is very fit. Bob was a member of the Preston Scout House Band. Rob was painted by a painter from India. The painting was mailed from India.

Sue is a fabric artist. Stephen volunteered at the Y.

Tina is an artist. Todd is a chiropractor. Cooper loves his mother Sarah and so does Beamer.

“ART MAKES YOU SMART”

beachbabybob aka robert fox

Robert Fox AKA BeachBabyBob wants you to check out these two web links:

The first is his travel blog…

Oh The Places You’ll Go

The second link goes to his storytelling channel,

Once Upon A Tome

He also frequently blogs on this beach website:

Beach Baby