Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia Multimedia Artist Živka Suvić – An Interview

As an artist myself, I am drawn to other artists.  When I come across an interesting artist, I look at their work and imagine what caused them to create it.  In all cases, the time and place of an artist influences their work, even if it is doing so unconsciously.  We are all influenced by our country, our upbringing, experiences, and so forth.  Every artist has a story, and it informs their work in intimate ways.  This is an obvious fact, but that doesn’t make it less interesting, because seeing an artists’ work is like seeing into their life in some way.

When I came across the work of Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia multimedia artist Živka Suvić, I was very interested in her creative process, because there was so much work and it has an intensity and energy that myself, as a Canadian, finds very different from the art I tend to see around here in Canada.

This is only logical.  Every country in this world is different, and Serbia certainly has its own character.  What that character is, I don’t know exactly, having not been to Serbia.  I know Serbian-born people who are living here in Canada right now, but it is not the same as visiting the country or knowing their history in detail.  Clearly, Serbia has had its share of unrest, and like it or not, this often breeds great artwork.  In my own rather uneducated way, I could sense this about Živka’s art.

Working in multiple mediums including assemblage, portraiture, landscape, and even incorporating video, Živka’s work seems to me to be of the sort that comes from a dark, restless soul.  At the same time, there is hope in her work.  In her portraits, eyes stare back at you, some judging, some questioning.

After checking out Živka’s website, I wanted to ask her some questions about her work.  Art speaks for itself, but if you have a chance to talk to the creator of that work, why not?

And so, I spoke with Živka recently and got a better idea of what makes this Serbian artist tick.  I hope you enjoy our chat!


Q: What inspires you to make art these days?

Art is my path, my way of communicating, my way to express myself. Since I was a child, I enjoyed painting or drawing. Later, I choose art to be my life’s occupation, or maybe art chose me. I don’t know, except to say that this is the way I function. Inspiration is around everywhere…

Q: What descriptive words come to mind to describe your own artwork?

Collecting, expression, time, materials…these are some of words.  Also…consistency…etc.

Q: How much does Serbian culture influence your artwork?

I’ve finished my studies at the Art Academy in Serbia, and during that educational process, we students were well informed with the world of art history.

Art history also covered the national history of art, but the focus wasn’t necessarily on national works.  On the contrary, we had the freedom of choice to choose our models.

Probably, the national culture has an impact on my work today, perhaps unconsciously, and certainly that social situation plays a big role on my life…

Q: How often do you show your work publicly?

I would say often. Last year, I had five independent exhibitions, and this year I have two.  In addition, I exhibit in group shows.

Q: Has a secret patron ever emerged from the shadows who wants to give you a vast sum of money to support you in your endeavours?

No, there was no secret patrons.  I have customers, buyers, but patrons…no.

Q: Why do you like creating artwork which has a tactile surface?

I use specific materials, and their nature allows me to create artwork which has a tactile surface.  I use papers, different thickness, cardboard, and decoupage technique.  That’s why the surface is tactile.

Q: Do you consider your art messy?

No, I don’t consider my art messy.  There is a certain order within what I am doing.  Every act of creation requires certain a chaos around it, but within the work there is a line.

Q: Do you consider some of your art to be “dark”?

Yes, I do, they are probably dark.  But they are just some of my works.  I think about the effect my work could have on the observer.  I can control what I want to exhibit.

Q: When painting your landscapes or your expressive portraits, do you paint from memory or prefer to do the work live?

I usually combine the two.  Sometimes, I start live and finish my work from memory….or vice versa.

Q: What is your special connection to New Zealand?

I spent a year and a half there studying, and New Zealand remained in my good memory.  I met wonderful people and made friends there.

Q: What is the purpose of an assemblage, in your view?

Specifically, assemblages that I’ve made in New Zealand stayed in the Art school in Dunedin, as an exhibit and demonstration material for future students.

I created them through a process of collecting discarded materials which were put in pillows and boxes.  Each pillow symbolically represents a dream.

Q: How often do you like to visit the ocean? Do you prefer oceans to lakes?

I’m fascinated by water, in general.  Right now, I don’t have any opportunity to see an ocean, but there is a river passing trough the city I’m living in.

Q:  Do you have any artists from the past who serve as inspirations to your work now?

Yes, I have many artists who are my inspiration, even though their work has no direct impact on mine, like Robert Rausenberg, Roy Lichtenstein, and Arman.  These are some of artists who inspire me.

Q: What are your artistic goals for the future?

Goals…I’m working on my new paintings and maybe, in the future, I will develop a story about assemblages. I have a goal to continue working, exhibiting, and selling my work…

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